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China Recent Economic Stimulus Timeline

November 21st, 2014 – November 19th, 2015: The PBoC reduced the deposit rate by 150 bps, the lending rate by 165 bps, and the reserve requirement ratio by 50 bps over the course of six cuts.

November 30th, 2015: IMF announced that the RMB will be added to the SDR currency basket.

December 21st, 2015: The Central Economic Work Conference announced measures to help stimulate the housing market including helping rural residents buy homes in urban areas and encouraging cheaper prices.

January 4th, 2016: The Chinese government activated circuit breakers after the Shanghai composite fell 7% in one day.

February 29th, 2016: The PBoC cut the reserve requirement ratio by 50 bps to 17% and injected $100 billion into the economy.

March 10th, 2016: The Chines government tripled the quota for bond sales by local governments so they can roll over existing debt at lower interest rates.

April 15th, 2016: The PBoC bought short term loans and reverse purchase agreements in order to inject RBM 220 billion into the economy.

April 25th, 2016: China accelerated its promotion of the IMF’s SDR basket to increase international acceptance of the RBM and reduce capital outflows.

May 4th, 2016: PBoC implemented the Pledged Supplementary Lending program to channel funding towards the China Development Bank, Agricultural Development Bank, and Export Import Bank.

May 10th, 2016: China’s government Cabinet approved and announced measures to increase exports which included more bank lending, tax rebates, and export credits.

May 12th, 2016: The NDRC and China Ministry of Transport announced a joint plan to invest 4.7 trillion yuan/$724 billion in transport infrastructure over the next three years for 303 projects.

June 7th, 2016: China announced it will give a 250 billion yuan ($38 billion) investment quota to the U.S and select an American bank to clear yuan transactions outside of the mainland.

June 26th, 2016: PBOC weakened the daily currency fixing by -0.9% to 6.6375 a dollar in response to Brexit spurred stronger USD.

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